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SPLASH 2017
Sun 22 - Fri 27 October 2017 Vancouver, Canada

Check out the program for the list of talks!

SPLASH-E will be held on Monday, October 23, at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Vancouver as part of any SPLASH events. Join us! The format—talks followed by small group discussion to spur Q&A, borrowed from venues like ICER—is designed to encourage contributions and engage attendees. We welcome your participation.

SPLASH-E is a new (started in 2013) forum for software and languages (SE/PL) researchers with activities and interests around computing education. Some build pedagogically-oriented languages or tools; some think about pedagogic challenges around SE/PL courses; some bring computing to non-CS communities; some pursue human studies and educational research. At SPLASH-E, we share our educational ideas and challenges centered in software/languages, as well as our best ideas for advancing such work. Unlike general conferences on computing education, SPLASH-E strives to bring together researchers and those with educational interests that arise from software ideas or concerns. Check out the program to see the excellent lineup of talks!

Symposium Format: We will adopt a Q&A format that fosters audience engagement and discussion. After each presentation, the audience will discuss the paper with those sitting around them for 2-3 minutes, identifying interesting issues or questions. The Q&A then moves to the standard full-room format, with many questions arising from the discussion at the tables. This format has been used very successfully at ICER (the Computing Education Research conference).

Note: submission dates have been updated for both types of submissions below. An earlier version of this page had submission dates listed as June 29; this has been extended. In addition, the page limit for CS Education Studies has been clarified to be 8 pages plus references. Contact the program chair with any questions.

Program

Title

1. Course Experience Reports

SPLASH-E invites submissions of course experience reports, which describe firsthand experiences from courses.

Rationale, or, Do You Know What (Else) I Did Last Semester?

Much of the SPLASH community is made up of educators. Alongside our research and engineering activities, we offer courses every year, and often put substantial new (and potentially novel) work into them. Often, these efforts are deeply technical, tied to insights on programming languages and software engineering that directly use our research expertise. Also often, these efforts go unnoticed except in side conversations and via offhand links to course web sites.

The community stands to benefit from a venue for discussing these efforts, and a format for presenting and sharing them.

Submissions

We invite submissions that describe past or current course experiences, designs, and tools. This could be:

  • a novel way of designing assignments for a particular topic
  • a description of a single extremely effective assignment
  • a useful method for grading programming work
  • a new (or old) tool for helping students
  • an experience (positive or negative) you had with a particular course offering
  • how you’ve adapted a well-known textbook to your course
  • other teaching experiences you’ve had that you want to present and discuss with the community

A focus on courses in introductory CS, software engineering, programming languages, and compilers is expected, but not required.

We invite submissions of any length, though we ask authors to target three to five pages. Authors should follow the same guidelines for anonymity as for OOPSLA (https://2017.splashcon.org/track/splash-2017-OOPSLA#Call-for-Papers).

As additional background, note that this approach is inspired by sessions like the Tips, Techniques, and Courseware track at ITiCSE, or the Demos sessions at SIGCSE:

http://ucsp.edu.pe/iticse2016/tips-techniques-and-courseware/

http://sigcse2016.sigcse.org/authors/demos.html

However, don’t be limited by those calls and formats. Consider especially domain-specific material or applications which the SPLASH audience may be particularly qualified to appreciate and comment on. If it’s a teaching experience that you’d like to share, we’re interested in hearing about it.

2. Computer Science Education Studies

We also welcome conventional papers describing CS education research results or tools. CS education studies should have a clear link to software systems or programming languages, either through research or topic area. Papers should be of length appropriate to their content, but in no case more than 8 pages, excluding references (this was changed since an original version of the call, which was 6 pages). Authors should follow the same guidelines for anonymity as for OOPSLA (https://2017.splashcon.org/track/splash-2017-OOPSLA#Call-for-Papers).

The submission format is the ACM large format (and page limits had this format in mind). That is, use the sigplan format at http://sigplan.org/Resources/Author/#acmart-format.

https://2017.splashcon.org/track/splash-2017-OOPSLA#Instructions-for-Authors

Submit here: https://splash-e17.hotcrp.com/

Mon 23 Oct

splash-2017-SPLASH-E
10:30 - 12:00: SPLASH-E - Languages and Semantics at Room 2
splash-2017-SPLASH-E150874740000010:30 - 11:00
Talk
splash-2017-SPLASH-E150874920000011:00 - 11:30
Talk
splash-2017-SPLASH-E150875100000011:30 - 12:00
Talk
splash-2017-SPLASH-E
13:30 - 15:00: SPLASH-E - Software Engineering at Room 2
splash-2017-SPLASH-E150875820000013:30 - 14:00
Talk
splash-2017-SPLASH-E150876000000014:00 - 14:30
Talk
splash-2017-SPLASH-E150876180000014:30 - 15:00
Talk